Recent Publications

New Evidence in Fight Against Malaria

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

In back-to-back articles published in the Oct. 22, 2010, issue of Science, Nora Besansky, professor of biological sciences, and Scott Emrich, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, served as lead and co-authors on articles for the studies conducted by an international consortium of scientists. >Read more

Novel Doping Technique for Semiconductors

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

A paper which appeared in the January 2010, issue of Science introduced a new high-efficiency p-type doping technique for semiconductor heterostructures. >Read more

Directly Dating Dinosaur Bones

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

In the February 2011 issue of Geology, Antonio Simonetti, research associate professor in civil engineering and geological sciences, co authored a paper employing a novel in situ laser U-Pb age dating technique via LA-MC-ICP-MS technology to directly date dinosaur fossils, the first successful direct dating of fossil vertebrate bones using this particular technology. The findings lend support to the hypothesis that not all dinosaurs survived the meteorite impact and mass extinction event that occurred approximately 65 million years ago.

Kogge Authors Paper on Next Generation Supercomputers

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Peter KoggeIn an invited paper, published in the February 2011 issue of IEEE Spectrum, Peter Kogge, the Ted H. McCourtney Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, discusses the current and future performance of supercomputers. According to Kogge, the power wall engineers are so familiar with will limit the rapid advance of computing performance experienced even a decade ago. Kogge was part of a study group chosen by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to identify the types of technologies engineers would need to build an exaflops-scale capable computer. In a 278-page report he and this panel of world-renowned experts determined that the biggest obstacle would still be power, and solving this issue would require engineers to rethink computer design, basically “starting from a blank slate.”

Walking Bacteria

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

According to a paper which appeared in the Oct. 7, 2010, issue of Science, bacteria are capable of standing upright and moving [walking] while they are vertical. The work stems from studies initially conducted by the paper’s co-author, Joshua Shrout, assistant professor of civil engineering and geological sciences and member of the University’s Eck Institute for Global Health. Shrout has been studying the surface motility of bacteria since 2004. >Read more

New Paper Describes the Relationship between Weather and Urban Noise

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

A paper presented during the 2011 American Society for Acoustics annual meeting by a team of researchers that included Harindra Joseph S. Fernando, the Wayne and Diana Murdy Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, suggests a cause-effect relationship between weather and urban noise. >Read more