College News

DARPA Awards $9.9 Million for Magnetic Logic

Posted on | July 11, 2011 | No Comments

Researcher in Nanofabrication LabThe Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has awarded a team of University researchers led by Freimann Professor Wolfgang Porod, director of the University of Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology, a $9.9 million grant to continue work toward developing a magnetic logic system, which could lead to all-magnetic information processing systems. >Read more

Energy Center Receives DOE Grant for Energy-efficient Cooling Systems

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

The Notre Dame Energy Center (NDEC) has been awarded a $2.8-million U.S. Department of Energy stimulus grant for a project that focuses on accelerating innovation in green technology while increasing America’s competitiveness in grid-scale energy storage, power electronics, and energy-efficient cooling systems. Titled “Mechanical Vapor Compression: Compact, Efficient Air Conditioning with Ionic Liquid Based Refrigerants,” the University project will develop more efficient ways of using carbon dioxide (CO2) as a refrigerant in industrial and residential cooling systems. >Read more

Researchers Receive TARDEC Grant for Next-generation Batteries

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

In conjunction with research being conducted by Mississippi State University on the development of materials for improved battery technology, researchers in Notre Dame’s colleges of engineering and science have been awarded more than $1.3 million from the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development, and Engineering Center. >Read more

Brennecke Receives ARPA-E Grant for Ionic Liquid Research

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Joan F. Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and director of the Notre Dame Energy Center, has received a $2.5-million grant through the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy to study how solid compounds turn into an ionic liquid when they react with carbon dioxide then turn back into a solid when the gas is released. >Read more

Medical Technologies Grants for Indiana-based Initiatives Head to Notre Dame

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Basar Bilgicer

Bilgicer

Bradley Gibson

Gibson

Paul Helquist

Helquist

Joshua Shrout

Shrout

Three University of Notre Dame faculty members — Z. Basar Bilgicer, Bradley S. Gibson, and Paul Helquist — have been awarded grants for new medical treatments and services from the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute as part of the Collaboration in Translational Research Pilot Program. >Read more

Civil Engineers May Help Design Infrastructure

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Tracy Kijewski-CorreaThe country’s civil infrastructure, approximately 10 percent of the Gross Domestic Product, is in disrepair. In fact, 25 percent of the nation’s bridges are either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. A Notre Dame team led by Tracy Kijewski-Correa, the Leo E. and Patti Ruth Linbeck Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, is studying the possibility that all stakeholders (public officials, students, even the public-at-large) could become participants in a solution by developing a virtual organization to rehabilitate the deteriorating infrastructure. >Read more

NSF Awards Grant for High-frequency Imaging System

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

A team in Notre Dame’s Advanced Diagnostics & Therapeutics (AD&T) initiative has been awarded a grant of $359,281 for the development of a room-temperature, portable terahertz (THz) imaging system from the National Science Foundation via the Integrative, Hybrid, and Complex Systems program. >Read more

NSF Awards Grant for Cyberphysical Systems

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

As part of a $5 million joint effort with Vanderbilt University, the University of Maryland, and General Motors Research and Development, Panos Antsaklis, the H.C. and E.A. Brosey Professor of Electrical Engineering, has been awarded a $1.5 million grant for the University’s role in a five-year research project titled “Science of Integration for Cyberphysical Systems.” >Read more

Adaptation to Climate Change Team Receives NSF Grant

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Nitesh ChawlaAn interdisciplinary team of faculty from the colleges of engineering, science, and arts & letters has received a Cyber-enabled Discovery and Innovation Type II Grant totaling more than $1.55 million from the National Science Foundation to build and study a virtual organization (the Collaboratory) for adaptation to climate change. >Read more

Kurama Receives Grant for Earthquake-resistant Wall Systems

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Yahya C. KuramaYahya C. Kurama, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences, has received an $894,467 grant from the National Science Foundation’s George E. Brown Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation program for core research in new and more practical types of earthquake-resistant reinforced concrete structural wall systems. >Read more

Twins Offer Insights to Biometrics Community

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Photos of twins taken during twin researchTwinsburg, Ohio, is the site of the largest annual gathering of twins in the world. Open to all multiples — identical and fraternal twins, triplets, and quads, the event was developed for those who share this unique bond. >Read more

Newest Engineering Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Stinson-RemickDedicated on Sept. 3, 2010, the Stinson-Remick Hall of Engineering has received an LEED Gold Certification from the United States Green Building Council. A 160,000-sq.-ft. engineering facility, Stinson-Remick Hall houses a nanotechnology research center, a 9,000-sq.-ft. semiconductor processing and device fabrication cleanroom, and an undergraduate interdisciplinary learning center. >Read more

ND Faculty Who Tracked Katrina Assisted in Oil Spill Forecasting

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

taccSince the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion on April 20, 2010, Professor Joannes Westerink and Assistant Professor Andrew Kennedy have been participating in efforts to forecast the movement of the oil spill in and around coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico. In fact, they received funding from the Department of Homeland Security and the National Science Foundation to apply their expertise to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, so they could provide information about the movement of the oil spill. >Read more

Four Faculty Named AAAS Fellows

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Four College of Engineering faculty members — Joan F. Brennecke, Prashant Kamat, Edward J. Maginn, and William F. Schneider — have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in honor of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications. >Read more

Go Selected as AFSOR Young Investigator

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

David B. Go, assistant professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, was selected by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research as one of 43 engineers and scientists who will participate in the 2011 Young Investigator Program. The program, which is only open to engineers and scientists at U.S. research institutions who have received a doctoral degree within the last five years, recognizes those who “show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research.” >Read more

Paolucci Elected APS Fellow

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Samuel PaolucciSamuel Paolucci, professor in the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, was recently elected a fellow of the American Physical Society. His research focuses on adaptive multiscale computational methods based on wavelets, fluid mechanics of multiphase flows, properties of nanofluids, and model reduction in complex reacting flows.

In addition to this most recent honor, he is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a member of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Paolucci joined the University in 1989.

Bohn Receives Redwood Award

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Paul BohnPaul W. Bohn, the Arthur J. Schmitt Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, director of the Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics (AD&T) initiative, and Notre Dame alum, was named the recipient of the 2010 Theophilus Redwood Award by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Presented annually to a leading analytical scientist who is an outstanding communicator, the award is sponsored by the Analytical Chemistry Trust Fund.

Bohn was honored “for the breadth and impact of his contribution to analytical science in the areas of microfluidics and nanoscale chemical sensing.”

A member of the Notre Dame faculty since 2006, Bohn’s research interests encompass molecular transport on the nanoscale, chemical sensors, and molecular approaches to nanotechnology, including but not limited to handheld devices for personalized health care and environmental monitoring applications (lab-on-a-chip).

He is a member of the American Chemical Society and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Blake Named ACM Distinguished Scientist

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Brian BlakeM. Brian Blake, associate dean for research and professor of computer science and engineering, has been named a Distinguished Scientist by the Association for Computing Machinery and selected as one of the “50 Most Important African-Americans in Technology” for 2011 by San-Francisco-based publisher eAccess Corporation. >Read more

Kareem Named Honorary Professor

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

One of the oldest and most prestigious institutions of higher education in China, Shanghai’s Tongji University has named Ahsan Kareem, the Robert Moran Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, an honorary professor in the Department of Bridge Engineering. He is the first Notre Dame faculty member and only the fifth civil engineering (bridge) expert to have received this honor. >Read more

Silliman Named Darcy Lecturer

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Steve SillimanStephen E. Silliman, professor of civil engineering and geological sciences, was named the 2011 Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer by the National Ground Water Research and Educational Foundation. >Read more

Seabaugh Appointed to Editorial Board of IEEE Journal

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Alan SeabaughAlan C. Seabaugh, professor of electrical engineering, Frank M. Freimann Director of the Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery (MIND), and associate director of the Center for Nano Science and Technology, has been appointed to the editorial board of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) Transactions on Electron Devices. One of the top 20 most cited journals in electrical and electronics engineering, the IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices publishes original contributions relating to the theory, design, performance, and reliability of electron devices from quantum-effect structures and emerging materials to integrated circuits and nanoscale devices. >Read more

Brennecke Named Editor of ACS Journal

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Joan F. Brennecke, the Keating-Crawford Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and director of the University of Notre Dame Energy Center, has been appointed editor of the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Journal of Chemical & Engineering Data. >Read more

Introducing New Senior Faculty

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Gretar TryggvasonGrétar Tryggvason joined the faculty as the Viola D. Hank Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering. Well-known for his contributions to computational fluid dynamics, particularly the development of methods for multiphase flows and for direct numerical simulations of such flows, Tryggvason has published more than 100 journal papers, given a large number of invited presentations, and supervised the research of more than 20 doctoral students. His research has been funded by a number of federal agencies, as well as corporations. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and American Society of Mechanical Engineers and serves as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Computational Physics. In addition, Tryggvason currently serves as interim chair for the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering.

Bertrand HochwaldIn January 2011, Bertrand Hochwald joined Notre Dame as the Frank M. Freimann Professor of Electrical Engineering. Most recently serving as vice president of systems engineering at Stanford University, Hochwald has also worked as chief scientist at Beceem Communications, Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff of Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies, and served as a visiting and consulting faculty member at several universities. His research interests encompass probability and information theory, communications systems, and signal processing. The owner of seven patents, he is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering fellow.

Fernando Plays Key Role in NATO Program

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Harindra Joseph S. Fernando, the Wayne and Diana Murdy Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, served as a key organizer and presenter at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Climate Change, Human Health, and National Security, which was held in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in April 2011. >Read more

Emeritus Faculty Member Serves on NHTSA Panel

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Push-button key fobs, air bags, cruise control, and other electronics make the modern car equivalent to a supercomputer on wheels. All of these systems are designed to guard against problems, but approximately 15,000 complaints related to unintended acceleration (UA) have raised concerns about complex electronic design, including the effect of electromagnetic interference on a vehicle and its safety. >Read more

New Evidence in Fight Against Malaria

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

In back-to-back articles published in the Oct. 22, 2010, issue of Science, Nora Besansky, professor of biological sciences, and Scott Emrich, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, served as lead and co-authors on articles for the studies conducted by an international consortium of scientists. >Read more

Novel Doping Technique for Semiconductors

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

A paper which appeared in the January 2010, issue of Science introduced a new high-efficiency p-type doping technique for semiconductor heterostructures. >Read more

Directly Dating Dinosaur Bones

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

In the February 2011 issue of Geology, Antonio Simonetti, research associate professor in civil engineering and geological sciences, co authored a paper employing a novel in situ laser U-Pb age dating technique via LA-MC-ICP-MS technology to directly date dinosaur fossils, the first successful direct dating of fossil vertebrate bones using this particular technology. The findings lend support to the hypothesis that not all dinosaurs survived the meteorite impact and mass extinction event that occurred approximately 65 million years ago.

Kogge Authors Paper on Next Generation Supercomputers

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

Peter KoggeIn an invited paper, published in the February 2011 issue of IEEE Spectrum, Peter Kogge, the Ted H. McCourtney Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, discusses the current and future performance of supercomputers. According to Kogge, the power wall engineers are so familiar with will limit the rapid advance of computing performance experienced even a decade ago. Kogge was part of a study group chosen by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to identify the types of technologies engineers would need to build an exaflops-scale capable computer. In a 278-page report he and this panel of world-renowned experts determined that the biggest obstacle would still be power, and solving this issue would require engineers to rethink computer design, basically “starting from a blank slate.”

Walking Bacteria

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

According to a paper which appeared in the Oct. 7, 2010, issue of Science, bacteria are capable of standing upright and moving [walking] while they are vertical. The work stems from studies initially conducted by the paper’s co-author, Joshua Shrout, assistant professor of civil engineering and geological sciences and member of the University’s Eck Institute for Global Health. Shrout has been studying the surface motility of bacteria since 2004. >Read more

New Paper Describes the Relationship between Weather and Urban Noise

Posted on | August 4, 2011 | No Comments

A paper presented during the 2011 American Society for Acoustics annual meeting by a team of researchers that included Harindra Joseph S. Fernando, the Wayne and Diana Murdy Professor of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, suggests a cause-effect relationship between weather and urban noise. >Read more